Fight Depression with Exercise

Lately, exercise has been at the forefront of every conversation about health. No doubt this careful attention is due to the increasing concerns over obesity and sedentary lifestyles. And it’s true that exercise can improve our health by reducing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and the risk of developing diabetes. Did you realize though that exercise also has amazing positive psychological effects?

Psychiatry: The Measureless Medicine

While other medical specialties recommend blood tests, X-rays, and other high-tech diagnostic equipment, psychiatrists only have the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and perhaps good listening skills. The DSM, currently in its 5th edition, is the bible of the mental health profession containing descriptions and symptom lists for every “official” mental health diagnosis.

Is Medication the Answer to Depression?

We are a culture of extremes, making it hard to see the gray or find middle ground. In the treatment of depression patients are exposed to one of two modes of treatment: traditional medicine or alternative treatment. Instead of this one-or-the-other approach, imagine what would happen if beneficial aspects from both of these viewpoints were combined to enhance psychiatric treatment for depression.

Finally Focused: Mineral Imbalances & ADHD (Part 1: Zinc Deficiency & Copper Excess)

What if there was a safe, effective, inexpensive, and simple way to help treat one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood? Health care professionals often overlook nutrients; yet imbalances in many minerals are frequently seen in medical disorders including ADHD. Fortunately, replenishing nutrients with an integrative treatment plan has proven to be an effective treatment for the symptoms of ADHD. In this two-part series, we will evaluate mineral deficiencies in zinc and magnesium, excess copper, and their relationship with neuropsychiatric symptoms.

Featured blog post on mindbodygreen

With less sunlight in the winter months, many people suffer from what’s commonly referred to as the “winter blues.” Technically, physicians recognize this as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).
The specific cause of SAD is unknown, but factors that may contribute to SAD include disruptions in circadian rhythm and serotonin and melatonin levels as a result of seasonal changes in sunlight patterns.

The Cinderella Story of Low Dose Lithium

Every four seconds, someone in the world develops dementia. Worldwide, an estimated 35.6 million people already live with a form of this neurodegenerative disorder, and these numbers are on a staggering rise. The World Health Organization has projected that the number of cases of dementia will double by 2030 (65.7 million) and triple by the year 2050 (115.4 million). Already in America the most common type of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, is the sixth leading cause of death: one in three seniors passes with this type of crippling memory loss (World Health Organization, 2015).