Is Medication the Answer to Depression?

We are a culture of extremes, making it hard to see the gray or find middle ground. In the treatment of depression patients are exposed to one of two modes of treatment: traditional medicine or alternative treatment. Instead of this one-or-the-other approach, imagine what would happen if beneficial aspects from both of these viewpoints were combined to enhance psychiatric treatment for depression.

Natural Treatment for ADHD

Finally Focused: Mineral Imbalances & ADHD (Part 2: Magnesium Deficiency)

There is a key nutrient that should be considered by all healthcare professionals, parents, and those struggling with ADHD: magnesium. Magnesium is a macromineral required for hundreds of the body’s biochemical reactions including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, bone development, DNA synthesis, and glutathione synthesis.

Finally Focused: Mineral Imbalances & ADHD (Part 1: Zinc Deficiency & Copper Excess)

What if there was a safe, effective, inexpensive, and simple way to help treat one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood? Health care professionals often overlook nutrients; yet imbalances in many minerals are frequently seen in medical disorders including ADHD. Fortunately, replenishing nutrients with an integrative treatment plan has proven to be an effective treatment for the symptoms of ADHD. In this two-part series, we will evaluate mineral deficiencies in zinc and magnesium, excess copper, and their relationship with neuropsychiatric symptoms.

Integrative Therapies for Depression Now Available

I’m excited to have co-edited and contributed to an important new book in the integrative mental health movement. Integrative Therapies for Depression: Redefining Models for Assessment, Treatment and Prevention summarizes emerging theories and research findings on various nonpharmaceutical therapies to treat mood disorders.

Featured blog post on mindbodygreen

With less sunlight in the winter months, many people suffer from what’s commonly referred to as the “winter blues.” Technically, physicians recognize this as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).
The specific cause of SAD is unknown, but factors that may contribute to SAD include disruptions in circadian rhythm and serotonin and melatonin levels as a result of seasonal changes in sunlight patterns.

The Cinderella Story of Low Dose Lithium

Every four seconds, someone in the world develops dementia. Worldwide, an estimated 35.6 million people already live with a form of this neurodegenerative disorder, and these numbers are on a staggering rise. The World Health Organization has projected that the number of cases of dementia will double by 2030 (65.7 million) and triple by the year 2050 (115.4 million). Already in America the most common type of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, is the sixth leading cause of death: one in three seniors passes with this type of crippling memory loss (World Health Organization, 2015).